Acridine Orange – 25g
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Acridine Orange – 25g

  • $180.33 Model Number IB74020


CAS# 10127-02-3

  • Used to detect single and double stranded nucleic acids
  • Fluoresces green at 530nm if stain intercalates in double-stranded DNA
  • Fluoresces orange-red at 640nm if stain intercalates in single-stranded RNA

Acridine Orange is a metochromatic stain that can be used to detect both single- and double-stranded nucleic acids. Acridine orange interacts with polynucleotides either by intercalation between stacked bases of dsDNA or RNA or electrostatically to the phosphate backbone when the polynucleotide is predominantly single-stranded.

If the stain intercalates between the stacked bases of the double-stranded nucleic acid, it will fluoresce green at 530 nm. If the stain binds to the single-stranded nucleic acids, it will fluoresce orange-red at 640 nm. Therefore, acridine orange is a very informative reagent when denaturing the structure of the nucleic acids that have undergone electrophoresis.

Acridine orange is more sensitive than ethidium bromide if the electrophoresis system has been denatured by gloxylation.

For a 1.5% agarose gel, stain with 30 mg/ml of acridine orange in 10mM sodium phosphate (pH 7.0) for 15 minutes at room temperature in the dark. To destain, run hot tap water over the gel for 15 – 20 minutes.

Physical Specifications
CAS#: 10127-02-3
Formula Weight: 370.0
Molecular Formula: C17H20ClN3 x ½ZnCl2
Em (490 nm, water): Min 36,500

IB74020 - Specification Sheet

Recommended Use
Acridine Orange is a metochromatic stain that can be used to detect both single-and double-stranded nucleic acids. Acridine orange interacts differently with polynucleotides, either by intercalation between the stacked bases of dsDNA or RNA, or when the polynucleotide is predominantly single-stranded by binding electrostatically to the phosphate backbone to produce a stacked array. If the stain intercalates between the stacked basses of the double stranded nucleic acid it will fluoresce green at 530 nm. If Acridine Orange binds to the single stranded nucleic acid, it will fluoresce orange-red at 640 nm. Therefore, acridine orange is a very informative reagent when determining the structure of the nucleic acids that have undergone electrophoresis. Acridine orange is also more sensitive than ethidium bromide if the electrophoresis system has been denatured by gloxylation.
For a 1.5% agarose gel, stain with 30 μg/mL Acridine Orange in 10 mM sodium phosphate (pH 7.0) for 15 minutes at room temperature in the dark. To destain, run hot tap water over the gel for 15-20 minutes.

Storage
Store at room temperature. Keep tightly sealed. Protect from moisture. Light Sensitive.

Warning
Irritant. Suspected mutagen. Avoid contact with eyes, skin, and clothing. Avoid breathing dust. Wash thoroughly with water after handling. See Material Safety Data Sheet for additional information.